Propagating your Fiddle Leaf Fig in 2 Easy Steps!

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Fiddle leaf fig

Propagating your Fiddle Leaf Fig in 2 Easy Steps!

Propagating your Fiddle Leaf Fig in 2 Easy Steps!

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Propagating a fiddle leaf fig (FLF) is a great way to create more plants of this popular houseplant. It’s also a fun project, and not too difficult! In this article, we’ll show you how to propagate FLFs using cuttings taken from the stems of your existing plants. You can also use leaves or even roots for propagation, but cuttings are the easiest method.

Here’s what you’ll need to get started:

– A sharp knife or pruning shears

– A clean, empty jar

– Distilled water

What is propagation and why is it important for fiddle leaf plants

Propagation is the process of creating new plants from existing plants. It’s an important process for fiddle leaf plants, as it allows you to create more plants from one original plant.

There are several methods of propagation, but the easiest is to take cuttings from the stems of your existing plants. You can also use leaves or even roots for propagation, but cuttings are the easiest method.

When you propagate a fiddle leaf fig plant, you’re actually creating new plants from the original. This helps to keep the original plant healthy, as it gives it a chance to spread its energy out. It also allows you to clone your favorite fiddle leaf fig plant, which can be a great way to get a new plant without having to go through the hassle of growing one from seed.

How to propagate a fiddle leaf fig in water

One easy way to propagate a fiddle leaf fig is to take a cutting from the stem and place it in water. You can also use leaves or roots for propagation, but cuttings are the easiest method.

  1. Fill a jar with distilled water and place the cutting in the water. It’s best to use a stem cutting that is 4-6 inches long.
  2. Place the jar in a spot out of direct sunlight and wait for the roots to grow! This can take anywhere from 3-4 weeks.
  3. Once the roots are about an inch long, you can transplant the cutting into a pot filled with potting soil. Be sure to water it well and keep it in a spot with bright, indirect sunlight.

Tips for Success

Propagating fiddle leaf fig in water can be easy and successful if you follow a few simple tips.

  • Make sure to use fresh, clean water and to change it regularly.
  • You should also keep the water level high enough to cover the roots of the cutting.
  • If you’re propagating a fiddle leaf fig from a clump, make sure to choose a healthy stem with plenty of leaves.
  • Finally, be sure to keep your cutting in a warm, sunny spot. With a little bit of care, you’ll be able to propagate a healthy fiddle leaf fig plant of your own.

Fiddle Leaf care

As with any plant, proper care is essential for keeping your fiddle leaf fig healthy and looking its best. Here are a few care tips to keep in mind:

Fiddle leaf figs prefer bright, indirect sunlight. Too much direct sunlight can scorch the leaves.

They also need plenty of water. Be sure to water them well, and keep the soil moist at all times.

Fertilize your plants every 2-3 months with a balanced fertilizer.

If you follow these tips, your fiddle leaf fig will thrive! For more detailed guide on fiddle leaf fig instructions, be sure to check out our other articles.

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Botanical Information

Scientific Name

Ficus lyrata

Common Name

Fiddle Leaf Fig

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